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Nitrogen and Spring Grass

Nitrogen and Spring Grass

It is commonly thought that the big problem with spring grass is magnesium deficiency. Magnesium is the central molecule of chlorophyll, which makes grass green, so you would think that the greener the grass, the calmer the horse. We have all found out that isn’t true!   So what is happening with Spring grass? Ground temperatures have warmed up to the point where as soon as moisture is added (it rains), the grass can uptake nutrients needed for growth, from the soil. Spring grass becomes ‘lush’ and is comparatively high in water. This exacerbates the lack of salt because it...

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Explosive, unpredictable over-reactions

Explosive, unpredictable over-reactions

Horses are dangerous to be around when they are over-reactive and spooky. If you have completed the Health Check on the website and there seems to be a lot of ticks in the ‘Dangerous’ section then you need to take urgent steps to adjust the diet as recommended in the Current Diet Review, Dietary principles and for more specific instructions click on ‘Changes to the Diet’. Riding a horse when he is grass-affected to this extent is the equivalent of being a passenger in a vehicle driven by someone on ‘P’! The outcome is out of your control and not...

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Fertiliser Issues

Fertiliser Issues

In a nutshell - DON'T DO IT!!! Never apply commercial fertilisers: NO Super, NO Nitrogen, NO NPK, NO urea and NO potash. They will all cause the grass to be even more unsuitable for your horses. You can apply Lime or Dolomite of the pasture needs it but you will run into big problems with the horses if you apply the commercial fertilisers! PIC: Persil wakes up from a snooze in a bed of mature unfertilized perfect horse grass. Think Twice Before Fertilising! This is a classic example of what can happen when you take advice from someone who comes...

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